Onychophorawesome

Posts tagged lizard

26 notes

nemertea:

I’m at Uluru now; I took a ton of pictures today, and will go through them shortly, but here are things from yesterday at Alice Springs Desert Park

About half of these are wild (including one goanna! [but not the perentie, alas]) the rest are from the aviaries onsite.

Also, if you ever go to Alice Springs, you should go here.

Filed under ROADTRIP ANYONE? birds lizard uluru

109 notes

rhamphotheca:

Calumma vohibola • a new chameleon species (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae) from the littoral forests of eastern Madagascar
[Herpetology • 2011] 
We describe Calumma vohibola sp. nov., a morphologically distinct chameleon
species of the Calumma nasutum species group from littoral forest fragments of the northcentral east coast of Madagascar. Males and females of this species differ from all other species of the Calumma nasutum group by an almost absent rostral appendage… We suspect that C. vohibola might be restricted to a rather small and fragmented distribution range within the last littoral forest fragments along the coast. Owing to the unsolved taxonomic situation of the C. nasutum group, no reliable distribution data of any member of this group are available at present, and hence we cannot ascertain whether the extent of occurrence of C. vohibola is indeed as restricted as suspected. Intensive surveys and field studies are necessary to clarify the distribution limits of this new species and to assess its conservation status reliably…

(read more:  http://www.mvences.de/p/p1/Vences_A220.pdf)

(via: NovaTaxa)

rhamphotheca:

Calumma vohibola • a new chameleon species (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae) from the littoral forests of eastern Madagascar

[Herpetology • 2011] 

We describe Calumma vohibola sp. nov., a morphologically distinct chameleon
species of the Calumma nasutum species group from littoral forest fragments of the northcentral east coast of Madagascar. Males and females of this species differ from all other species of the Calumma nasutum group by an almost absent rostral appendage… We suspect that C. vohibola might be restricted to a rather small and fragmented distribution range within the last littoral forest fragments along the coast. Owing to the unsolved taxonomic situation of the C. nasutum group, no reliable distribution data of any member of this group are available at present, and hence we cannot ascertain whether the extent of occurrence of C. vohibola is indeed as restricted as suspected. Intensive surveys and field studies are necessary to clarify the distribution limits of this new species and to assess its conservation status reliably…
(via: NovaTaxa)

Filed under chameleon lizard

403 notes

denizensofearth:

Western Smooth Knob-tailed Gecko, Nephrurus levis occidentalis
Knob tailed geckos, which comprise some eleven species, are native to Australia.  This particular species is found (unsurprisingly) in the western part of the continent.  These charismatic little lizards live in the arid regions such as deserts and dry grasslands and spends most of their time in underground burrows to avoid the heat.  
At night, they emerge to hunt insects.  When they spot prey, they often wave their knobbed tails as if excited.  Scientists aren’t sure what the tail knobs are for, but it has been noted that the cells that make up the knob are drastically different from those in the rest of the gecko’s body.  It’s possible that the knobs may be some kind of sense organ.  Knob-tailed geckos are shy and don’t like to be approached by humans, and most of what scientists know about them comes from observation in captivity.

denizensofearth:

Western Smooth Knob-tailed Gecko, Nephrurus levis occidentalis

Knob tailed geckos, which comprise some eleven species, are native to Australia.  This particular species is found (unsurprisingly) in the western part of the continent.  These charismatic little lizards live in the arid regions such as deserts and dry grasslands and spends most of their time in underground burrows to avoid the heat.  

At night, they emerge to hunt insects.  When they spot prey, they often wave their knobbed tails as if excited.  Scientists aren’t sure what the tail knobs are for, but it has been noted that the cells that make up the knob are drastically different from those in the rest of the gecko’s body.  It’s possible that the knobs may be some kind of sense organ.  Knob-tailed geckos are shy and don’t like to be approached by humans, and most of what scientists know about them comes from observation in captivity.

(Source: reptilechannel.com, via rhamphotheca)

Filed under gecko lizard reptile

66 notes

herplove:

Thorny Devil (Moloch horridus) overhead view, native to the Central Desert, Western Australia

One of my favourite binomial names, Moloch horridus, with horridus being Latin for “bristly” and Moloch being in reference to a biblical devil. Moloch was originally a “false god” with a bull’s head. People offered their children to the hungry fires of Moloch with the promise of a good harvest if they did so. Moloch is mentioned in the Old Testament, but in the middle ages the name “Moloch” became associated with a prince of Hell.

herplove:

Thorny Devil (Moloch horridus) overhead view, native to the Central Desert, Western Australia

One of my favourite binomial names, Moloch horridus, with horridus being Latin for “bristly” and Moloch being in reference to a biblical devil. Moloch was originally a “false god” with a bull’s head. People offered their children to the hungry fires of Moloch with the promise of a good harvest if they did so. Moloch is mentioned in the Old Testament, but in the middle ages the name “Moloch” became associated with a prince of Hell.

(via ecdysozoa)

Filed under moloch Moloch horridus thorny devil lizard

304 notes

rhamphotheca:

Mexican Mole Lizard (Bipes biporus)

by IUCN staff

This fossorial (burrowing) species requires areas with sandy soils with abundant leaf litter; it is rarely seen on the surface. The general habitat in its area of distribution is dryland and desert, with xeric shrub vegetation. Animals are often collected close to fenceposts, and populations are believed to be able to survive in moderately disturbed landscapes. They construct an elaborate system of burrows just below the surface, usually centered on stands of vegetation.

This species is endemic to the Baja California peninsula of Mexico, where it ranges from extreme southwestern Baja California State through western Baja California Sur, to the Isthmus of La Paz and the western Cape Region. It is probably a relatively abundant species, but it is secretive and is not often encountered. Papenfuss (1982) collected 2,719 specimens in an extensive study of the species…

(read more: IUCN)        

(TL - Bradford D. Hllingsworth; TR - Dr. Jessie Maisano via: Digimorph; BL - via Mexico Herps; BR - uncredited)

Filed under lizard

120 notes

rhamphotheca:

Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum)
Looking very similar to Australia’s Thorny Devil (Moloch horridus), the Texas Horned Lizard (sometimes misleadingly called a “horny toad”) is found across the south central and south western united states and in Northern Mexico, in grassy and arid habitats. Like the Thorny Devil, this lizard eats primarily ants, though it also takes termites and other small insects.Also like the thorny devil, they are covered with protective spikes.

(photo by Jerry Oldenettel)
The horned lizards (there are a number of species) have a specialized defense mechanism. When seized or molested by a predator, they can break capillaries in the corners of their eyes and SQUIRT BLOOD!

(individual has just squirted blood, photo by Randomtruth)
Because of habitat disturbance, this lizard is in decline in parts of its historical range. They are a protected species in the state of Texas.
(top photo: Ken-ichi Ueda)

rhamphotheca:

Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum)

Looking very similar to Australia’s Thorny Devil (Moloch horridus), the Texas Horned Lizard (sometimes misleadingly called a “horny toad”) is found across the south central and south western united states and in Northern Mexico, in grassy and arid habitats. Like the Thorny Devil, this lizard eats primarily ants, though it also takes termites and other small insects.Also like the thorny devil, they are covered with protective spikes.

(photo by Jerry Oldenettel)

The horned lizards (there are a number of species) have a specialized defense mechanism. When seized or molested by a predator, they can break capillaries in the corners of their eyes and SQUIRT BLOOD!

(individual has just squirted blood, photo by Randomtruth)

Because of habitat disturbance, this lizard is in decline in parts of its historical range. They are a protected species in the state of Texas.

(top photo: Ken-ichi Ueda)

Filed under texas horned lizard lizard

66 notes

zolanimals:

Thorny Devil (Moloch horridus) is an Australian lizard. It grows up to 20 cm (8 in) in length and can live up to 20 years,  coloured in camouflaging shades of desert browns and tans; these change  from pale colours when warm to darker colours when cold. The thorny devil is covered in hard, somewhat sharp spines to dissuade  predators by making it difficult to swallow. It also has a false head on  its back: when it feels threatened it lowers its head between its front  legs, and only the false head is visible. (Wiki.)

zolanimals:

Thorny Devil (Moloch horridus) is an Australian lizard. It grows up to 20 cm (8 in) in length and can live up to 20 years, coloured in camouflaging shades of desert browns and tans; these change from pale colours when warm to darker colours when cold. The thorny devil is covered in hard, somewhat sharp spines to dissuade predators by making it difficult to swallow. It also has a false head on its back: when it feels threatened it lowers its head between its front legs, and only the false head is visible. (Wiki.)

(via rhamphotheca)

Filed under thorny devil lizard australia animal

251 notes

rhamphotheca:

allaboutreptiles: HYDROSAURUS or THE SAILFIN LIZARD

our mystery animal! thanks to Baberista and this Anon for figuring out the name of this reptile!
these lizards are a group of large-bodied lizards from the tropical regions of eastern Indonesia, New Guinea and the Philippines. these lizards like water, and lots of it. they are often found basking near their streams.
They flee at the first sight of danger, typically running into  the water until they sink and swim away. Their ability to hide  underwater for up to an hour helps to ensure any threats pass. it also implements their sailfins.
these animals grow up to 3-4 feet long, depending on gender.
they are omnivorous, meaning they eat both insects and veggies/fruits.
Sailfin dragons have now been classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN.  Their main threats are being hunted for food and collection for the pet trade…these parts are of interest to pet owners…but are not very available, or common. they are more skittish then iguanas, and MUCH harder to care for than iguanas…which are pretty hard…so it’s not recommended to a new reptile owner…or even an intermediate one. the only place you can get one is from the Philippines but they have protected the lizards, making it pretty hard, unless you live there or obtain one illegally.
there is not a lot of information on them, whether it be in the wild or in captivity.
in my research i found this website to be most helpful and informative about these animals….at least in a pet owning way…which i still dont recommend.

rhamphotheca:

allaboutreptilesHYDROSAURUS or THE SAILFIN LIZARD

our mystery animal! thanks to Baberista and this Anon for figuring out the name of this reptile!

these lizards are a group of large-bodied lizards from the tropical regions of eastern Indonesia, New Guinea and the Philippines. these lizards like water, and lots of it. they are often found basking near their streams.

They flee at the first sight of danger, typically running into the water until they sink and swim away. Their ability to hide underwater for up to an hour helps to ensure any threats pass. it also implements their sailfins.

these animals grow up to 3-4 feet long, depending on gender.

they are omnivorous, meaning they eat both insects and veggies/fruits.

Sailfin dragons have now been classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN.  Their main threats are being hunted for food and collection for the pet trade…
these parts are of interest to pet owners…but are not very available, or common. they are more skittish then iguanas, and MUCH harder to care for than iguanas…which are pretty hard…so it’s not recommended to a new reptile owner…or even an intermediate one. the only place you can get one is from the Philippines but they have protected the lizards, making it pretty hard, unless you live there or obtain one illegally.

there is not a lot of information on them, whether it be in the wild or in captivity.

in my research i found this website to be most helpful and informative about these animals….at least in a pet owning way…which i still dont recommend.

Filed under hydrosaurus lizard sailfin lizard